Ted Noffs Foundation

Ted Noffs Foundation

3.5
3.5333 out of 5
Working at Ted Noffs Foundation
Ratings by 15 Ted Noffs Foundation employees

3.5

3.5333 out of 5
15 ratings in total
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86%
86% rate salary as high or average
66%
66% employees recommend this employer to friends
Your trust is our main concern so these ratings for Ted Noffs Foundation are shared 'as is' from employees in line with our community guidelines

Employee reviews

5 out of 55.0
last year

Admin Team

Mar 2021

Admin Team

New South Wales, Australia
1 to 2 years in the role,

Dynamic, adaptive, and resilient. Caring whilst also respecting personal boundaries.

The good things

Working within a small team with international background, it is always interesting to share different perspective and opinions. The Management and the team have always been very supportive especially during the COVID-19 pandemic last year when we all had to adjust with a new way of work.
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The challenges

As part of the admin team there is little to no chance to work directly with the young people, however it is also rewarding to provide support to the team.
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4 out of 54.0
7 years ago

Alcohol and Other Drugs Worker

Oct 2015

Alcohol and Other Drugs Worker

Randwick, New South Wales, Australia
Less than 1 year in the role, current employee

Flexible, dynamic, adaptive, fun employment with the privilege of working with amazing staff and inspiring young people

The good things

There are many good things about working in The Ted Noffs Foundation. The legacy of such a passionate and controversial man is a living and evolving social Hendra that is unfolding into the community in the form of many different programs designed to reach as many people as possible. I work as an AODW in the PALM program in Randwick. My experience of the good things of working in the TN Foundation include training days, external and internal supervisions and the opportunity to be involved in a strong and supportive team of AODWs, AFCs, intake/admin officers and managers. Communication and mutual support in the PALM program is strong and the working environment is therapeutic and positive. There is a good salary sacrifice package on offer, which is great. Overall, one of my favourite places I've worked at. Many people of different ethnicities, cultures, etc employed at Noffs. Quite often snagging tickets to football games, X-Factor shows, etc.
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The challenges

Working for a charity organisation means that even things that are \"urgent\" take two weeks to be resolved. This can be quite frustrating as waiting for approval for money for various items, etc. can become tedious. The majority of the time, things run reasonably well there considering the fact that the clientele can be so unpredictable. There is no staff parking at PALM, so that makes getting to the car at the end of late shifts a bit of a stressful situation. \"All day\" parking in Randwick is difficult to find as well. It is difficult to find a work/life balance in this industry. This is no more or less than any other organisation that I know of, but the work/life balance is a challenge nonetheless. Not a great dea of opportunity for career development as AODW, as there are only two AODW positions (AODW and Senior AODW), but there is often scope for employees to jump between programs and stay within the organisation.
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1 person found this helpful
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Company overview

Originally named The Wayside Foundation, Noffs Foundation was founded in 1970 by the great Australian humanitarian, Reverend Ted Noffs and his wife Margaret Noffs. During their remarkable careers of pioneering initiatives for young people, the Noffs established Sydney’s first crisis centre in 1968, set up the first Drug Referral Centre in Sydney in 1967, co-founded the Aboriginal Affairs Foundation in 1962 and co-founded Lifeline in 1963. Ted’s son, Wesley and his wife Amanda Noffs took over the foundation after Ted suffered a stroke. They renamed the organisation, The Ted Noffs Foundation. Wesley and Amanda worked alongside academics to create the country’s first drug and alcohol rehabilitation centre for adolescents known as PALM. The community and government immediately supported the idea and the work of Noffs Foundation spread across Australia. Source: This is an extract from the company's own website.
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