Archived News

2015 Media Releases

10.12.15 December SEEK Marketplace Report
  1.12.15 Aussie careers no longer a fixed path as life long learning provides opportunities for change
20.11.15 Innovation and excellence in recruitment recognised at SEEK Annual Recruitment Awards
18.11.15 Attracting a workforce when there's no salary on offer
12.11.15 October SEEK Marketplace Report | Fit goals fuel gym jobs
  9.09.15 Australian job market celebrates two years of growth
  9.07.15 Special Report | FY15 employment review
11.06.15 Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics a viable career option in Eastern States
13.05.15 Property boom builds trade industry jobs
15.04.15 Healthy outlook for those looking for career opportunities in Healthcare
12.03.15 New SEEK Executive Team and structure changes
11.03.15 Banking and Finance industry prving a good investment for jobseekers
12.02.15 Australia's largest industries pulling their weight - New job ads up
15.01.15 Aussie Labour Market spurred on by "non-resource" industries

Media Release

10th December 2015

December SEEK Marketplace Report
WEAK DOLLAR PROMOTES AUSTRALIA’S HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM INDUSTRY

The lower Australian Dollar is having a positive impact on Australia's hospitality and tourism industry which is good news for the economy, and jobseekers. International visitors now see Australia as an affordable place to holiday, and Aussies are choosing to spend their weaker dollar on local holidays.

International visitors to Australia are up seven percent for 2015, while domestic overnight trips are up five per cent during the same period.1 Reflecting on the increase in tourism, and the flow-on effect this is having for hospitality, SEEK has seen a healthy demand in Hospitality and Tourism jobs advertised. New positions in this industry are up 11 per cent year on year to November 2015.

Michael Ilczynski, Managing Director of SEEK Employment said there is a growing demand for hotels and restaurants to meet the rise in domestic and international visitors.

"Housekeeping and kitchenhand jobs have experienced the biggest growth, both up 20 per cent from last year; while chefs and cooks and management positions are both up 17 per cent. Bar and beverage staff and waiting staff were up seven and six percent respectively."

Figure 1: SEEK New Job Ads in Hospitality and Tourism 2014 to 2015
Figure 1: SEEK New Job Ads in Hospitality and Tourism 2014 to 2015

While the largest employing sectors within the industry are experiencing positive growth, some of the smaller advertising sectors are seeing declines. Demand for travel agents and reservations staff has dropped as customers turn to online platforms to make their own travel and accommodation bookings.

Of the largest employing states, New South Wales experienced the biggest year on year growth in new job ads in Hospitality and Tourism, up 14 per cent; followed by Victoria, up 12 percent; and Queensland is up six per cent. South Australia experienced an 18 per cent increase, albeit a small employing state. Western Australia dipped two per cent.

"The strong growth across many of the states in Hospitality and Tourism is great news for jobseekers. We see that the industry typically offers a good mix of full-time and part-time roles so if this is a career pathway, or an opportunity for a summer holiday job the opportunities are out there," Mr Ilczynski said.

According to the Tourism and Transport Forum, the peak industry group for Australian tourism, transport and aviation sectors, New South Wales attracted 3.3 million international visitors in the year to September 2015 - up a healthy six per cent on the previous year.

"We are seeing massive growth in the Chinese market for New South Wales, with 536,000 visitors (up 21 per cent) spending over $2.2 billion in the year to September that means more demand for restaurants, cafes and accommodation. Jobs are being created to support the demand on businesses servicing the industry," Tourism and Transport Forum CEO Margy Osmond said.

"Tourism is a fantastic sector to be employed in and represents a great opportunity to develop important skills that will be used throughout any fulfilling career path."

ACROSS THE COUNTRY

SEEK new job advertisements are nine per cent higher than the same time last year, following a year of steady growth. This upward trend is reflected by the number of jobs advertised on seek.com.au rising 1.3 per cent from October 2015 to November 2015.

Figure 2: SEEK New Job Ads growth year on year to November 2015
Figure 2: SEEK New Job Ads growth year on year to November 2015

Job advertisements remain stronger in the states least exposed to mining. Tasmania presented an annual rise of 22.3 per cent, the Australian Capital Territory grew 21 per cent, New South Wales has increased 14.4 per cent and Victoria has gained by 14.2 per cent. Western Australia job ads are now 13.1 per cent lower than November 2014 figures.

The Northern Territory is now starting to weaken with job advertising declining two per cent in November - the fifth consecutive monthly drop.

Advertising in Queensland has made a modest recovery over the past year, now sitting 6.9 per cent higher than a year earlier. In South Australia new job ads are up five per cent year on year.

Across the country there have been slightly less applications per job advertised, which means less competition for jobseekers in the roles they're applying for.

1 Austrade Tourism Research, State of the Industry 2015, published November 2015

-ENDS-

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Media Release

1st December 2015

Aussie careers no longer a fixed path as life long learning provides opportunities for change

With exams now over for Year 12s across Australia, graduates and school leavers will be feeling the pressure to decide what line of work they’re going to pursue, or what tertiary study they’ll apply for to set up their career.

But as new research from SEEK reveals, this decision does not need to dictate the next 40 years of work life, as one career for a lifetime is no longer the norm.

In fact, 65 per cent of Australians are now working in a different job or career than they set out on when they finished school1, which shows career diversification is now standard. The research also shows women are more likely to move to different jobs or careers, with almost 72 per cent working in a different career than intended when leaving secondary school, compared to just 59 per cent of men.

The pressure for eighteen-year-olds to define their career must ease, said Managing Director of SEEK Employment, Michael Ilczynski.

“Aussies, particularly parents, need to wrap their heads around the concept that having many jobs and careers is not a sign of their child’s inability to settle down, or make up their mind. It certainly doesn’t give indication to the likelihood of their career success. Businesses value innovative and fresh thinking, having a broad base of experience equips us with this capability.

Businesses are realising career-change can be a positive thing, as people with experience across many roles and industries often have a wider knowledge set and diversity in thinking which brings a whole new perspective to the workplace.

By working in a range of organisations across a range of industries, workers gain experience with diverse tools and technologies, and new industry and business disciplines. This provides the opportunity to develop a highly valued skill set of responsiveness, agility and resilience.

“It is these types of non-technical skills that are particularly appealing to employers,” Mr Ilczynski said.

As the industries and economies we work in evolve, we must develop the skills to evolve with it, according to SEEK Learning Managing Director Joe Powell.

“Life-long learning plays an important role in setting Aussie workers up for a healthy and satisfying career.”

For many, learning doesn’t stop at graduation, with more than 52 per cent of Aussies continuing to upskill throughout their career.

“The types of skills and capabilities you can pick up from educational institutions or on-the-job training can be equally as valuable, depending on what students are looking for from a career,” Mr Powell said.

“My advice to parents is encourage your child to make the most of each workplace they enter in, even if it may not be their dream job. It is through turning up to work highly engaged, asking questions and putting their hand up to take on new responsibilities and opportunities that they’ll understand their strengths and weaknesses and gain those important skills. It is this attitude that will set them up for good career opportunities as they progress,” Mr Ilczynski said.

1Source: Independent research conducted by Survey Sampling International (SS)I on behalf of SEEK. Interviewing 4800 Australians annually with data being weighted to be nationally representative of age, gender, location, employment status and income (based on ABS).

-ENDS-

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Media Release

20th November 2015

INNOVATION AND EXCELLENCE IN RECRUITMENT RECOGNISED AT SEEK ANNUAL RECRUITMENT AWARDS

The recruitment industry paused to celebrate outstanding achievement at the 13th SEEK Annual Recruitment Awards (SARAs) held last night at Pier One in Docklands, Melbourne. Hosted by Julia Zemiro and officially welcomed by SEEK CEO and co-founder Andrew Bassat, over 300 of the industry’s emerging and top recruiters came together to acknowledge excellence in recruitment.

“The SARAs is a perfect opportunity to recognise the innovation in a sector which plays such a significant role in helping Aussies find fulfilling jobs and careers. There are some exceptionally talented individuals and organisations that drive continual improvement in client and candidate interactions, and we are really proud to be able to honour them,” explains Michael Ilczynski, Managing Director SEEK Employment.

The judging panel for the awards comprised of Debra Eckersley, Managing Partner of Human Capital at PwC; Steve Granland, CEO of the Recruitment & Consulting Services Association (RCSA); Ben Lawrence, Chief Human Resources Officer at Wesfarmers; and Julie Mills, CEO of the Information Technology, Contract & Recruitment Association (ITCRA).

Judging took place across four categories, and for the first time there was a People’s Choice Award.

AWARD CATEGORY

2015 WINNER

Recruitment Agency of the Year
  • Small
  • Medium
  • Large
 
  • Evolve Scientific Recruitment
  • Morgan McKinley
  • Talent International

Most Innovative Agency of the Year

Talent International

Excellence in Candidate Management

M&T Resources

Recruitment Leader of the Year

Anne Sabine, Co-founder and Managing Director at Evolve Scientific Recruitment

People’s Choice Award

Jo Skipper, Melbourne Director at The Next Step

The People’s Choice Award, which is voted by the industry, recognises the most inspiring recruiter or industry contributor in Australia. In 2015, this was awarded to Jo Skipper.

Industry peers commented on Fiona’s leadership in social media and the training she provides within the industry, while John was recognised for his commitment to educating and evolving the public and governments understanding of the industry. Both John and Fiona were recognised for their mentoring and charitable activities.

“I love my job, I love it. And to have others say they respect what I do, that’s even better,” said Ms Skipper.

Industry peers commented on the Jo’s integrity, honesty and professionalism, which they said is reflected in her stand-out client base in Victoria. Jo was also recognised as being an exceptional ambassador for the Australian recruitment industry. When asked what keeps her passionate about the recruitment industry, Ms Skipper explained that “knowing that absolutely everyday I’m going to meet someone new, somebody different.”

“It is with the ongoing drive for excellence by our Australian recruiters and industry contributors – such as that demonstrated by Jo Skipper and all other award recipients, that we are able to celebrate such success each year at the SARAs,” summarises Mr Ilczynski.

Jo Skipper from The Next Step, winner of People’s Choice Award at the SEEK Annual Recruitment Awards (Photo: SEEK)

If you would like to arrange an interview with the winners or Janet Faulding, or request supporting photographs please contact;

Stephanie Paul – Corporate Communications Specialist, SEEK Limited

E: spaul@seek.com.au

P: +61478 399 688

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK operates across 19 countries with exposure to over 4 billion people and 28 per cent of GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.

SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalisation close to A$6billion and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies Globally by Forbes, and Number One in Australia.

For 18 years SEEK has been an integral part of Australians’ job-search process, and as the country’s leading employment marketplace is uniquely positioned to empower Australians with career, education and volunteer opportunities to create productive and fulfilling working lives.

About SEEK Annual Recruitment Awards

The SEEK Annual Recruitment Awards (SARAs) was founded by SEEK in 2002 as a way to recognise best practice within the recruitment industry. Now in its 13th year, the SARAs has grown to become the country’s leading event to celebrate excellence within the sector.

For more information, visit www.seeksara.com

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Media Release

18 November 2015

ATTRACTING A WORKFORCE WHEN THERE’S NO SALARY ON OFFER — WHAT NOT-FOR-PROFITS NEED TO KNOW

The not-for-profit sector contributes just over 4 per cent of Gross Domestic Product to the nation's economy, at around $43 billion. It's big business, and is largely supported by volunteers who contribute an additional $14.6 billion in unpaid work to the economy every year 1.

Research conducted by SEEK Volunteer revealed that only 16 per cent of working Australians volunteer 2. This leaves a large portion of our working population who are not volunteering.

These are concerning statistics given the working population across Australia has many of the skills and experience which not-for-profit organisations now require to remain competitive, explains Head of SEEK Volunteer, Amanda Robinson.

"With more than 600,000 not-for-profits operating in Australia alone, it is a highly competitive industry when it comes to attracting people into their organisation. Unless the working population really gets behind volunteering, our not-for-profits are going to find it harder and harder to deliver their services to the community," said Ms Robinson.

There are thousands of volunteer roles currently available on www.seekvolunteer.com.au, many of which require highly skilled volunteers with experience across; Governance, Accounting, IT, Counselling, Mediation, Policy Development and Marketing.

"One of the biggest challenges not-for-profits face is attracting volunteers with the specific skills they require to support day-to-day operations and growth. Without having the biggest attraction tool, financial remuneration at their disposal they need to be clear on the value and opportunities they can give back to volunteers. This all starts at the first point of contact a not-for-profit has with a potential volunteer - the role advertisement," Ms Robinson says.

Across Australia there are currently more than 12,000 volunteer opportunities available - so finding great volunteers is highly competitive.

"To help volunteer organisations find the right people, they first need to get them to feel compelled to apply for the position," explains Ms Robinson. "The best volunteer job ads are those that paint a clear picture about why someone would volunteer their time to support your cause. They speak to the impact the person will make in this role, the networks they'll get exposed to and the on-the-job skills and experience they can gain, while contributing to a cause they're passionate about. With a few simple tweaks, we usually see a vast improvement in the suitability of volunteer applications."

1 ABS Contribution of the Not-for-Profit Sector, Productivity Commission Research Report, January 2010
2 Independent research by GFK on behalf of SEEK (Jan 2014- March 2014). Data is weighted to be nationally representative of age, gender, location, employment status and income (combination of ABS stats)

Here are the top tips that will change how you approach advertising for volunteers.

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK operates across 19 countries with exposure to over 4 billion people and 28 per cent of GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.

SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalisation close to A$6billion and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies globally by Forbes, and number one in Australia.

For 18 years SEEK has been an integral part of Australians’ job-search process, and as the country’s leading employment marketplace is uniquely positioned to empower Australians with career, education and volunteer opportunities to create productive and fulfilling working lives.

About SEEK Volunteer

SEEK Volunteer is Australia’s largest single online source of volunteering opportunities and has been responsible for connecting thousands of volunteers with organisations needing their help since 2000.

Currently there are close to 12,000 volunteering opportunities on the site and over 6,000 registered organisations. Opportunities range from event-based work to skilled volunteering across Australia.

There is no cost to volunteers or organisations to use the SEEK Volunteer website.

SEEK Volunteer is part of the SEEK Group of companies

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Media Release

12 November 2015

OCTOBER SEEK MARKETPLACE REPORT | FIT GOALS FUEL GYM JOBS

Latest data from SEEK shows new job advertisements are 7.8 per cent higher than this time last year, and relatively unchanged month on month, down just 0.3 per cent from September.

This dip is off the back of a solid 1.1 per cent increase from August.

SEEK Employment Managing Director, Michael Ilczynski, said it was not uncommon to see hiring intentions slow down towards the end of the calendar year, as businesses often delay hiring of new employees until the new year.

The overall annual rise in SEEK new job ads in some of the larger key advertising industries is a result of the continued market strength in the Education and Training, Design and Architecture, Government and Defence, Healthcare and Medical and Trades and Services classifications.

Figure 1: SEEK New Job Ads growth year on year to October 2015
SEEK New Job Ads growth year on year to October 2015

INDUSTRY INSIGHT | SPORT AND RECREATION

More Australians are recognising the importance of a fit and healthy lifestyle, in turn creating new jobs in the sector, with Sport and Recreation jobs advertised on SEEK up 11 per cent in October 2015, compared with a year ago.

Within the industry, management jobs advertised on SEEK are up 23 per cent year on year, with gym management positions making up the bulk of these. The industry's largest job advertising category of Fitness and Personal Training jobs are up 11 per cent, which also shows the growth in demand for fitness services. Coaching and Instruction jobs were up a healthy 8 per cent.

According to Jetts General Manager, Elaine Jobson, investment in the fitness market is growing at a rate of about 1 per cent per annum, with new gym openings each year.

"This growth leads to an increase in the amount of fitness jobs in demand. The position of gym manager plays a vital role in determining the success and culture of a gym, and therefore requires a qualified fitness professional with the right management skills.

"Personal Training is becoming a lot more accessible to the everyday person - it is no longer something only celebrities can afford. We have found a lot of people are moving out of corporate jobs and into PT (Personal Training) roles to achieve more work-life balance and to do something that they love, while inspiring people to live a better life," Ms Jobson said.

Candidates looking to the fitness industry for a career change, and a lifestyle away from the desk, will be pleased to see growing opportunities available on SEEK, Mr Ilczynski said.

"This is one category of advertising which is in demand throughout the nation, with year on year increases in all states and territories, and large double-digit gains in the Australian Capital Territory, Queensland, South Australia, and Tasmania," he said.

Figure 2: SEEK New Job Ad trends across Australia in Sport and Recreation
SEEK New Job Ad trends across Australia in Sport and Recreation

JOB AD TRENDS BY STATE MONTH BY MONTH

New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory were the only states and territories to experience consecutive month on month new job ad growth. NSW had a rise of 1.4 per cent, whilst the ACT observed a monthly increase of 0.1 per cent. The increase, particularly in New South Wales, was sufficient enough to negate the dips seen in all other states for the month.

The continuing downtrend of Australia's weakest state, Western Australia, recorded its ninth monthly decline in job advertisements in 12 months, down 16.2 per cent year on year. The market is also relatively weak in South Australia, with 1.2 per cent fewer jobs than this time last year.

"There have been more candidates applying for each available job advertised in the weaker labour markets of Western Australia in particular, but also in South Australia and the Northern Territory which makes it a competitive market for jobseekers in those states," Mr Ilczynski said.

"In a more competitive market, job seekers might benefit from using apps to be notified as soon as potential jobs become available, and consider volunteering to build skills in a new industry and diversify their experience."

Job advertising in the Northern Territory is also beginning to weaken, with moderate falls in each of the past three months. Advertising in Queensland effectively reversed last month's two per cent rise, but has improved moderately in recent months to be five per cent higher than a year earlier, he said.

JOB AD TRENDS BY STATE YEAR ON YEAR

The strength in year on year growth rates continues to remain strongest in economies least exposed to mining - ACT job ads are up 26 per cent, Tasmania is up 19.3 per cent, NSW is up 15.7 per cent, and Victoria is up 9.9 per cent.

Victorian advertising is above year-ago levels in 23 of 30 industry classifications.

"Victoria is experiencing a relatively moderate upswing in job advertising, with many industrial classifications experiencing double digit year on year gains," Mr Ilczynski said.

Figure 3: SEEK New Job Ad growth year on year by state
SEEK New Job Ad growth year on year by state

SEEK EMPLOYMENT INDEX

The SEEK Employment Index (SEI) - the ratio of new job ads to the number of applications for those jobs - dipped 0.8 per cent nationally in October 2015, following sustained growth in recent months, apart from August.

Over the past year, the SEI has risen by around 10 per cent nationally, signifying a moderate tightening in labour markets with less applications per job advertised, and consequently, slightly less competition for available positions for those seeking a job.

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK operates across 19 countries with exposure to over 4 billion people and 28 per cent of GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people's lives on a global scale.

SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalisation close to A$6billion and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies Globally by Forbes, and Number One in Australia.

For 18 years SEEK has been an integral part of Australians' job-search process, and as the country's leading employment marketplace is uniquely positioned to empower Australians with career, education and volunteer opportunities to create productive and fulfilling working lives.

About the SEEK Employment Report
The SEEK Employment Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace. The report includes the SEEK Employment Index (SEI), which is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.

SEEK's total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK's total job ad volume.

Disclaimer: The Data should be viewed and regarded as standalone information and should not be aggregated with any other information whether or not such information has been previously provided by SEEK Limited, ("SEEK"). The Data is given in summary form and whilst care has been taken in its preparation, SEEK makes no representations whatsoever about its completeness or accuracy. SEEK expressly bears no responsibility or liability for any reliance placed by you on the Data, or from the use of the Data by you. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately.

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Media Release

9 September 2015

Australian job market celebrates two years of growth

Key Highlights
  • SEEK New Job Ads up almost 2 per cent in August on the previous month and 11 per cent from August 2014.
  • Top performing categories include Education and Training, Farming, Design & Architecture, Call Centre and Customer service and Marketing and Communications.
  • Focus on employee retention creates demand for Internal Communications specialists.

SEEK’s latest employment data shows while mining continues to wind back, five varied sectors enjoyed double digit growth last month, accounting for a 1.9 per cent rise on July’s listings, and two years of consecutive growth in the jobs market.

Education and Training, Farming, Design and Architecture, Call Centre & Customer Service, and Marketing and Communications rounded out the top five performers, demonstrating the breadth of opportunities available for job seekers.

Figure 1: SEEK New Job Ads growth year on year to August 2015
SEEK New Job Ads growth year on year to August 2015

Managing Director of Employment at SEEK, Michael Ilczynski, says there is a range of industries providing job opportunities as resources roles decline.

“The steady increase in job ads is consistent with the recent ABS data, and while there were varying performances recorded across the states, the general direction for the nation is positive. We are seeing greater spend on advertising in Queensland, while South Australia and the Northern Territory soften, and West Australia is in clear decline.”

Education and Training continues to climb as the top industry experiencing growth in August, with Farming, Animals and Conservation close behind (26 per cent).

“Industries like Marketing and Communications are performing strongly with jobs in internal communications leading the pack with a 41 per cent increase this month, while brand managers were also in demand (up 34 per cent).”

“Naturally digital and search marketing continues to steadily grow as we spend more and more time online – with only trade marketing on the decline. Again, this would reflect the retraction in the mining states.”

David Khadi, Regional Director, Michael Page Marketing says the steady job growth has resulted in a focus on employee loyalty and retention; explaining the spike in certain Marketing and Communications roles.

“With an increase in jobs, comes an increase in demand and competition for the best candidates in the market. Employee engagement and empowerment has been a key focus and, because of this, many companies are bringing on internal communication specialists to really drive employee engagement initiatives. Furthermore, the ever-increasing competitive landscape for consumers is ensuring brand loyalty and retention is key, hence the increase in brand management roles.”

“There is also no doubt that digital-based roles will increase year-on-year for the foreseeable future. All companies need to have a digital presence and even with some industries lagging behind their international counterparts on this, they are making up for lost time. It’s one of the strongest areas in which we have seen growth over the last few years and will continue to be a focus for companies.”

Figure 2: SEEK New Job Ads Marketing and Communication to August 2015
SEEK New Job Ads Marketing and Communication to August 2015

AUGUST JOB AD TRENDS BY STATE

The emerging trend of a strengthening in advertising across Queensland continues, having risen in five of the past six months to be six per cent higher than this time last year.

Non-mining economies continue to show strength in advertising, namely the ACT (up 32.7 per cent year-on-year), NSW (up 21.4 per cent year-on-year), Tasmania (up 17.4 per cent year-on-year) and Victoria (up 12 percent year-on-year). Weakness continues in the regions with greatest exposure to mining, specifically Western Australia (down 12.4 per cent year-on-year) and Northern Territory (down 2.8 per cent year-on-year).

South Australia, which has less exposure to mining but is more reliant on the manufacturing sector also experienced softening, with a 1.8 per cent decrease year-on-year.

SEEK New Job Ads Australia, August 2015 vs August 2014

SEEK Employment Index
The SEEK Employment Index (SEI) – which measures the ratio of new job advertisements posted on the SEEK website to job applications for those ads – fell by 1.8 per cent in August 2015, largely reversing a rise of 2.1 per cent in July 2015. This was mainly due to a 3.8 per cent rise in job applications, double the increase in the new job ads index.

So while the advertising job market was up by almost two per cent for August, the SEI was 10.0 per cent higher than a year ago, reflecting the overall growth in the job market.

The only state to report growth in August was South Australia, experiencing a slight upturn of 0.7 per cent.

Following strong rises across the eastern states in July, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria partially reversed their respective gains of 4.7, 3.1 and 3.8 per cent in August. In Queensland, the SEI fell the most, at 2.6 per cent, followed by Victoria, down 2.4 per cent; and New South Wales down 1.8 per cent in the month.

Western Australia continued its ongoing decline, down 3.5 per cent.

About SEEK
SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK operates across 19 countries with exposure to over 4 billion people and 26 per cent of GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.
SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalisation close to A$6billion and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies Globally by Forbes, and Number One in Australia.

For 17 years SEEK has been an integral part of Australians’ job-search process, and as the country’s leading employment marketplace is uniquely positioned to empower Australians with career, education and volunteer opportunities to create productive and fulfilling working lives.

About the SEEK Employment Report
The SEEK Employment Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace.

The report includes the SEEK Employment Index which was developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.
SEEK’s total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK’s total job ad volume.

Disclaimer: The Data should be viewed and regarded as standalone information and should not be aggregated with any other information whether or not such information has been previously provided by SEEK Limited, ("SEEK"). The Data is given in summary form and whilst care has been taken in its preparation, SEEK makes no representations whatsoever about its completeness or accuracy. SEEK expressly bears no responsibility or liability for any reliance placed by you on the Data, or from the use of the Data by you. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately.

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Media Release

9 July 2015

SPECIAL REPORT | FY15 Employment Review

Key Highlights
  • FY15 SEEK New Job Ads up 10.9 per cent from FY14
  • Australia’s largest advertising industries remain strong
  • New South Wales remains a standout performer over the past financial year, with 19.3 per cent more new job ads than FY14
  • Western Australia is the only state in which job ads are below year-ago levels

Despite Australia’s topsy-turvy market conditions –SEEK’s data shows the nation’s workforce needs you more than ever, with employment opportunities looking better than this time last year.

SEEK’s latest employment data shows FY15 closed with a 10.8 per cent year-on-year growth in new job advertisements (slightly ahead of the ANZ total market report, showing 9.9 per cent increase in new job ads during the same time period).

The SEEK Employment Index, the only index in the Australian market to measure supply against demand recorded an 11 per cent rise. This increase means there are fewer applications per job than in the previous year.

Managing Director of Employment at SEEK, Michael Ilczynski says given the complex dynamics happening in the economy right now it is encouraging to see employment opportunities are still being created.

“Our data reveals an improvement in the labour market from a candidate’s perspective. The slight decline in applications per advertisement in New South Wales, and the uptick we’ve seen in advertised wages over the year in Victoria presents good news for those considering a job change in those two states particularly. Unfortunately over the past 12 months we’ve not seen opportunities for jobseekers in Western Australia look as promising.”

So, for those seeking a role — where do the strongest opportunities for employment lie?

It helps to be skilled in areas where the highest number of roles become available. SEEK data outlines the biggest advertising industries all showed steady growth. There were also a number of industries that demonstrated exceptional year-on-year growth within their sector.

The biggest advertising industries for FY2015 include:
1. Trades & Services (up 18 per cent year-on-year)
2. Healthcare & Medical (up 15 per cent year-on-year)
3. Information & Communication Technology (up 13 per cent year-on-year)
4. Sales (up 6 per cent year-on-year)
5. Accounting (up 4 per cent year-on-year)

The top five industries for percentage job ad growth between FY2014 and FY2015 include:
1. Design and Architecture (42 per cent)
2. Farming, Animals and Conservation (29 per cent)
3. Trades and Services (18 per cent)
4. Marketing and Communications (17 per cent)
5. Banking and Financial Services (17 per cent)

There are also some industries that stand out as feeling the greatest impact of the skills shortage in Australia. Of the 29 industries SEEK analysed, the five most in need of labour resources included: Law, Real Estate, Insurance and Superannuation, Education, and Government and Defence. The data also reveals that typical salaries in these industries easily exceed the national average of $76,000 per annum1

In the short–medium term, the largest employing industries are likely to continue to offer the greatest opportunities, and people may be surprised to see the variety of opportunities on offer says Ilczynski.

“For example, In Information Technology we’ve got emerging roles such as App Developers and highly specialist developer roles. Keeping across new jobs is made easy with SEEK Profiles and also the job recommendations we are now sending to millions of Australians every day.”

SEEK New job advertisements FY15 vs FY14

 JOB AD TRENDS BY STATE

In spite of continuing concerns about the health of our economy, the SEEK indicators rose strongly in June 2015, with the number of new job ads placed with SEEK rising by 2.8 per cent in the month.

All states recorded an increase in month-on-month job advertising in June, with the largest jump being Tasmania, with 14.7 per cent month-on-month increase in new job ads in June.

In terms of annual growth New South Wales remains a standout performer over the past year, with 19.3 per cent more new job ads in June than a year earlier. Victoria has also seen strong growth, with a 12 per cent increase on year ago figures.

Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory (have recorded decent year-on-year gains, compared with modest single digit growth in Queensland (5.9 per cent), South Australia (2.2 per cent) and Northern Territory (4.3 per cent).

Western Australia is the only state in which job ads are below year-ago levels, with June 2015 ads 9.3 per cent below the level in June 2014.

Ilczynski says the figures reflect improving trends for the non-mining states.

“Queensland has seen six per cent growth on this time last year, which is encouraging given the state’s notable exposure to mining. However, resource-heavy Western Australia has struggled to see a pickup in employment opportunities across the board as it appears the downturn in mining is not only impacting mining labour demand, but negatively impacting demand for labour across the board.

“Another factor supporting job advertisements in June may have been the more benign approach taken by the Government to the Federal Budget which received a much more positive response in comparison with the measures announced in 2014.”

SEEK Employment Index
The SEEK Employment Index rose 1.2 per cent in June. This is an 11 per cent increase on a year ago. This means there is now less competition for jobseekers as there are fewer applications per role than in previous months, as June saw a 4.2 per cent decline in job applications for new job ads.

In New South Wales, the SEEK Employment Index was up 1 per cent; followed by Victoria, up 3.1 per cent; and Queensland 0.4 per cent, but fell 0.3 per cent in South Australia, and 0.5 per cent in Western Australia.

About SEEK
SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK operates across 19 countries with exposure to over 4 billion people and 26 per cent of GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.
SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalisation close to A$6billion and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies Globally by Forbes, and Number One in Australia.

For 17 years SEEK has been an integral part of Australians’ job-search process, and as the country’s leading employment marketplace is uniquely positioned to empower Australians with career, education and volunteer opportunities to create productive and fulfilling working lives.

About the SEEK Employment Report
The SEEK Employment Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace.

The report includes the SEEK Employment Index which was developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.
SEEK’s total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK’s total job ad volume.

Disclaimer: The Data should be viewed and regarded as standalone information and should not be aggregated with any other information whether or not such information has been previously provided by SEEK Limited, ("SEEK"). The Data is given in summary form and whilst care has been taken in its preparation, SEEK makes no representations whatsoever about its completeness or accuracy. SEEK expressly bears no responsibility or liability for any reliance placed by you on the Data, or from the use of the Data by you. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately.

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Media Release

11 June 2015

Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics a viable career option in Eastern States

Improving from a low point in mid-2013, job advertisements in the combined Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics industry have been rising in non-mining related states.

Looking at the Manufacturing sector, pockets of growth are off-setting the decline within areas of manufacturing that have been impacted by the reduction in mining investment.

New job ads in Assembly and Process work are up 24 per cent year on year, with new job ad growth also seen in the line of Pickers and Packers, Machine Operators and Warehousing, Storage and Distribution.

Within Transport and Logistics, jobs in public transport and taxi services, including courier drivers and delivery services, are driving up employment with 43 per cent year on year growth. Aviation, and freight and cargo forwarding jobs are also showing favourable year-on-year growth to May 2015.

Managing Director of Employment at SEEK, Michael Ilczynski, said the Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics industry was showing areas of opportunity for jobseekers.

“The pull-back in mining investment has had significant impact on the combined Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics industry. Areas of the industry which are heavily reliant or exposed to mining, such as mining-related transport and manufacturing remain in decline. However, the strength of the New South Wales and Victorian markets, which are less exposed to mining, are creating opportunities within this industry, particularly in transport,” he said.

Figure 1: SEEK New Job Ad growth across the Australian Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics Industry, year-on-year to May 2015

SEEK New Job Ad growth  across the Australian Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics Industry, year-on-year  to May 2015

 

Figure 2: SEEK new job ads monthly – Australian Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics Industry, 2007 to 2015

SEEK new job ads monthly –  Australian Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics Industry, 2007 to 2015

Tasmania leads the pack with the Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics industry growing 23 per cent year-on-year to May 2015. This is followed by New South Wales with a strong 19 per cent growth, while Australian Capital Territory is up 8 per cent, and Victoria is up 6 per cent. Opportunities in Western Australia have declined 23 per cent, Northern Territory down by 20 per cent and Queensland down by 3 per cent.

MAY NEW JOB ADS
SEEK new job ads fell nationally 3.1 per cent in May, partially reversing the 4.7 per cent gain recorded in April. Job advertising across Australia is 8 per cent higher than a year ago.

New South Wales was the only state to post growth in May, up 1.8 per cent. This follows the encouraging 5.5 per cent growth the month prior.

Australian Capital Territory figures dropped 7.4 per cent in May after a 10.6 per cent April rise, Victorian jobs dropped 5.2 per cent in May after a 5.6 per cent April rise, while Queensland was down 2.1 per cent month-on-month after a 3.9 per cent rise in April.

South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia recorded significant declines in May advertising.

“The fall we’ve seen in May data is not surprising given the notable increase in new job ads which we witnessed in April. April data is often inconsistent due to the interruption of advertising as a result of Easter and ANZAC Day public holidays,” Mr Ilczynski said.

Year on Year the predominantly non-mining states, particularly New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory, continue to record the strongest increases in job advertising. Over the past year gains ranging between 10 and 25 per cent have been recorded year on year. This reflects improving trends for much of the non-mining economy. The regions most exposed to mining have a lower level of advertising than a year ago, with Western Australia in particular seeing advertising more than 12 per cent down on May last year, and Northern Territory down 2.7 per cent year-on-year.

“Advertising in Queensland is making slow forward progress, likely reflecting the mixed nature of its economy and weakness in the state’s smaller mining sectors. This is only slightly offset by an improvement in non-mining sectors – especially the labour market in Brisbane and south east Queensland,” Mr Ilczynski said.

South Australia advertising remained relatively weak in recent months.

Figure 3: SEEK New job advertisement percentage growth year-on-year by state

SEEK New job advertisement  percentage growth year-on-year by state

 INDUSTRY TRENDS

According to the official ABS labour market statistics, jobs growth is currently recording trend growth of around 19,000 per month, which has been sufficient to arrest the slow upward trend for unemployment.

The industries advertising for jobs continue to broadly reflect the sectoral and state trends. Continuing from previous months, advertisements for jobs in mining remain the weakest of all sectors down 42 per cent year-on-year, although advertisements in the Science and Technology recorded the first year-on-year gain in months, up 9 per cent.

Farming, while relatively small in number, continues to record the strongest year-on-year gains, up 32 per cent; followed by Design and Architecture, up 24 per cent, which reflects strength in residential construction.

Among the largest advertising sectors recording strong gains are Healthcare and Medical, up 10 per cent year-on-year; Information and Communication Technology, up 11 per cent year-on-year; and Administration and Office Support, up 6 per cent year-on-year.

SEEK Employment Index
The SEEK Employment Index increased 1.1 per cent in May 2015, remaining almost unchanged from April. This means there is now greater opportunities for jobseekers as there are fewer applications per role than in previous months.

In Queensland the SEEK Employment Index was up 2.8 per cent in New South Wales up 2.6 per cent; followed by Western Australia, up 2 per cent and South Australia up 1.4 per cent; but fell in Victoria by 2.1 per cent.

About SEEK
SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK operates across 19 countries with exposure to over 4 billion people and 26% of GDP. SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.
SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalisation close to A$6billion and has been listed in the Top 20 Most Innovative Companies Globally by Forbes, and Number One in Australia.                                                              

For 17 years SEEK has been an integral part of Australians’ job-search process, and as the country’s leading employment marketplace is uniquely positioned to empower Australians with career, education and volunteer opportunities to create productive and fulfilling working lives.

About the SEEK Employment Report
The SEEK Employment Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace.

The report includes the SEEK Employment Index which was developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.
SEEK’s total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK’s total job ad volume.

Disclaimer: The Data should be viewed and regarded as standalone information and should not be aggregated with any other information whether or not such information has been previously provided by SEEK Limited, ("SEEK"). The Data is given in summary form and whilst care has been taken in its preparation, SEEK makes no representations whatsoever about its completeness or accuracy. SEEK expressly bears no responsibility or liability for any reliance placed by you on the Data, or from the use of the Data by you. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately.

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Media Release

13 May 2015

Property boom builds trade industry jobs

The strength in the nation’s real estate market is proving good news for those in roles supporting the property industry, as new SEEK job figures show a heightened labour demand for roles in the Trades and Services sector.

Strong property prices, and record low interest rates, are boosting the real estate market, in-turn driving a 13 per cent year-on-year growth in new job ads within the Trades and Services industry across Australia.

Managing Director of Employment at SEEK, Michael Ilczynski, said the demand for labour  was excellent news for those with trade skills as the number of opportunities for employment has seen significant growth, particularly in eastern states.

“New job ads in the building industry, in particular for gardeners and landscapers, plumbers, builders, carpenters and cabinet makers, are in highest demand compared with other trades like welders and boilermakers, butchers, fitters and turners and automotive workers.”

Figure 1: SEEK New Job Ad growth across the Australian Trades and Services Industry, year-on-year to April 2015

New job ads Trades and Services

Steve Shepherd, Employment Market Analyst and Group Director of Public Affairs at recruitment and HR specialist Randstad, agreed low interest rates and the residential real estate boom across the eastern states has fuelled growth in the trades sector.

“This has been further strengthened by commercial construction as well as state and federal governments’ investment in infrastructure projects. This has seen projects move from the design phase in to the build phase, placing more demand across the board on the building trades sector from construction through to finishing roles.

“Demand is high across the board from bricklayers, plumbers, framers and electricians to plasterers, painters and landscape gardeners. And we do not expect demand to decrease in the short to mid-term, the further reduction of interest rates in May is likely to stimulate more investment in property,” Mr Shepherd said. 

The demand for Trades and Services by state also highlights the geographical divide in the Australian economy.

“The non-mining states have each seen significant increases in demand for Trades and Services over the past year, no doubt reflecting the strength in residential construction, particularly high density housing in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane,” Mr Ilczynski said.

“Meanwhile the mining states have generally recorded weaker demand for Trades and Services, which are likely reflecting reduced labour demand as major projects complete and mining companies cut back on capital and operating expenditure, on the back of lower commodity prices.”

The smaller states lead the pack with growth in jobs in the Trades and Services industry up 68 per cent year-on-year in Tasmania; followed by Australian Capital Territory with 34 per cent growth, Victoria up 32 per cent, New South Wales up 28 per cent, and Queensland up four per cent. Jobs across the industry dipped in Northern Territory by 9 per cent, South Australia down 8 per cent, and Western Australia down 13 per cent.

APRIL NEW JOB ADS
Nationally, new jobs advertised in April rose 4.9 per cent month-on-month. New job ads are now 12.1 per cent higher than year-ago figures.

“April saw the largest monthly increase since July 2010, when the labour market was recovering from the global financial crisis” Mr Ilczynski said.

At a state level we continue to see the non-mining economies driving the growth. New South Wales new job ads are up 5.8 per cent month on month and Victoria new job ads up 5.7 per cent.

Queensland, while exposed to the resources sector, but to a lesser degree than Western Australia, bounced back strongly up 4.4 per cent month-on-month. This more than reverses the three per cent fall recorded in February following the Queensland election result. South Australia new job ads increased 2.9 per cent while advertising in the Australian Capital Territory again surged 11 per cent month-on-month, to be 34.8 per cent higher than previous year’s figures.

Western Australia remained relatively unchanged, up just 0.4 per cent. Tasmania recorded a small fall in new job ads after a run of generally strong growth in the past 12 months.

 

Figure 2: SEEK new job advertisement percentage growth year-on-year by state

 

SEEK new jobs Australia
INDUSTRY TRENDS

The Australian economy is experiencing an ongoing divide between the demand for housing and the weakness in resources and associated sectors, which is reflected in the job ad data, according to Mr Ilczynski.

The April data shows strength in property-related sectors Design and Architecture, with jobs up 39 per cent; Construction up 18 per cent; and Trades and Services up 13 per cent year-on-year; but weakness in Mining, Resources and Energy revealing a 38 per cent dip, and Science and Technology down 11 per cent.

The IT sector, an industry that generally leads other sectors, showed a 23 per cent rise in April, continuing the steady run of growth seen in recent months.

“While a relatively small advertising group, the continued growth in Farming, Animals and Conservation suggests some overall strength in agriculture, notwithstanding some areas of the country continuing to experience severe climatic conditions,” he said.

SEEK Employment Index
The SEEK Employment Index increased 1.4 per cent in April 2015, which means that there is now greater opportunities for jobseekers as there are less applications per role than in previous months.

The Index increased in New South Wales 2.5 per cent and Victoria 2.7 per cent, but remained relatively unchanged in Queensland (-0.1 per cent), and fell in both South Australia 3.4 per cent, and Western Australia 1.8 per cent.

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalization close to A$6 billion.

With exposure to 2.5 billion people and over 20 per cent of global GDP, SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.

SEEK Australia currently receives around 30 million visits per month. The SEEK experience is seamless across desktop, mobile and iPad and currently over 59 per cent of all visits to seek.com.au are via mobile devices. 

In Australia, SEEK also has the SEEK Learning business which connects people with education and training to advance their career, SEEK Commercial, where people can find businesses and franchises for sale and SEEK Volunteer, Australia’s largest single source of Volunteering opportunities.

Source: SEEK Omniture Data February 2015

 

About the SEEK Labour Market Report

The SEEK Labour Market Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace.

The report includes the SEEK Employment Index which was developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.
SEEK’s total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK’s total job ad volume.

Disclaimer: The Data should be viewed and regarded as standalone information and should not be aggregated with any other information whether or not such information has been previously provided by SEEK Limited, ("SEEK"). The Data is given in summary form and whilst care has been taken in its preparation, SEEK makes no representations whatsoever about its completeness or accuracy. SEEK expressly bears no responsibility or liability for any reliance placed by you on the Data, or from the use of the Data by you. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately.

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Media Release

15th April 2015

Healthy outlook for those looking for career opportunities in Healthcare

The Healthcare and Medical Industry is one of heightened labour demand, based on the latest new job ad figures reported by SEEK.

Year on year to March 2015 new job ads rose 14 per cent nationally within the industry.

All states saw the growth in new job ads for Healthcare and Medical outpace average job ad growth across all industries, except for South Australia, which is still tracking at subdued levels despite having strong growth in the industry.

Western Australia new job ads in Healthcare and Medical led the pack, up 42 per cent year on year to March 2015. This significant spike in labour demand for Healthcare and Medical professionals comes off the back of increased investment by the State and Commonwealth Government and other parties to cope with the growing population spurred by the mining boom; Perth’s population is expected to increase by more than 500,000 by 2031.

In partnership with the Commonwealth Government and other partners, the Government of Western Australia is investing more than $7 billion over a 10 year period to build new hospitals and health centres, and improve existing facilities. The scope of activity is anticipated to touch more than 50 different communities presenting opportunities for those looking for work in this industry right across the state.

In other states, growth in Healthcare and Medical jobs was strong with South Australia new job ads up 14 per cent, New South Wales up 12 per cent, Queensland up 10 per cent and Victoria up 9 per cent year on year to March 2015.

Broadly the growth in new job ads was driven by an increase in labour demand for nurses. Aged Care Nursing, which is the largest employing nursing speciality, increased 11 per cent year on year.

New job ads for more specific nursing roles including Nurse Facilitators, ICU Nurses, Paediatric Nurses and Psychiatric Nurses, all experienced growth of more than 40 per cent year on year to March 2015.

Managing Director of Employment at SEEK, Michael Ilczynski, said “as one of Australia’s largest employing industries it’s encouraging to see an increase in job opportunities across all states – particularly for those who are interested in seeking careers in this field.”

“For those who are actively looking for jobs in this industry our application data tells us that the easiest roles for hirers to fill in the Healthcare and Medical industry are Chiropractic roles, Medical Administrators and Dentists. This means those looking for these jobs are likely to have a lot of competition from other job seekers.

“On the flipside the hardest roles to fill, based on number of applications per job, are in Midwifery, Paediatric Nursing and Nurse Educator roles. Job seekers looking for careers in these areas are likely to have less competition from other job seekers,” said Ilczynski.

Figure 1: New Job Ad volume growth across Healthcare and Medical Industry, year on year to March 2015
New Job Ad volume growth across Healthcare and Medical Industry, year on year to March 2015

MARCH NEW JOB ADS

Nationally new job ads in March 2015 remained relatively unchanged, nudging up 0.2 per cent from February 2015. New job ads are now 6.7 per cent higher than March 2014.

Month on month minor gains were recorded across South Australia, up 2.1 per cent; Queensland, up 0.9 per cent; Victoria, up 0.4 per cent; and New South Wales, up 0.2 per cent. Western Australia recorded another month of decline, down 3.8 per cent.

More broadly, the message remains that there is strength in job advertising in the mostly non-mining states of New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory. But, relative weakness continues in states more exposed to mining. This is particularly so for Western Australia which year on year is down 12.4 per cent in new job ads.

“Although mining wanes, the exceptional growth in Medical and Healthcare roles in Western Australia is a direct flow on effect from the steep population growth the boom brought with it a few years back,” Ilczynski said.

Figure 2: SEEK job growth Year on Year by state
SEEK job growth Year on Year by state

INDUSTRY TRENDS

The strength of the property market remains evident through the growth of related industries. Design and Architecture is up 40 per cent year on year, and Construction is up 18 per cent. Trades and Services are up 14 per cent.

The Farming sector continues to strengthen, up 60 per cent year on year, although this is a small employing industry relative to other industries in the economy.

There remains considerable weakness in labour demand across the Mining, Resources and Energy Industry, down 38 per cent year on year.

“Despite the unchanged outcome for new job ads this month, underlying trends continue to look positive across most industries and the larger states, albeit with significant restraint continuing from weak advertising in areas related to mining and in the states particularly exposed to mining,” Ilczynski said.

-- ENDS --

SEEK Employment Index

The SEEK Employment Index fell 0.8 per cent in March 2015 indicating a strong volume of applications for every job ad which is currently posted on SEEK. The Index increased in New South Wales 0.9 per cent, but fell in other states: Victoria 0.3 per cent, Queensland 2.8 per cent, South Australia 0.9 per cent and Western Australia 4.4 per cent.

Public Relations Manager, Seek Limited
E: smacartney@seek.com.au
P: 03 8306 0818 or 0433 949 639

About the SEEK Labour Market Report

The SEEK Labour Market Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace.

The report includes the SEEK Employment Index which was developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.
SEEK’s total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK’s total job ad volume.

Disclaimer: The Data should be viewed and regarded as standalone information and should not be aggregated with any other information whether or not such information has been previously provided by SEEK Limited, ("SEEK").    The Data is given in summary form and whilst care has been taken in its preparation, SEEK makes no representations whatsoever about its completeness or accuracy.  SEEK expressly bears no responsibility or liability for any reliance placed by you on the Data, or from the use of the Data by you.   If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately.

*Source: hardest and easiest to fill roles are based on February data – SEEK February Hard to Fill Jobs Report 2015

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalization close to A$6 billion.

With exposure to 2.5 billion people and over 20 per cent of global GDP, SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.

SEEK Australia currently receives over 28.5 million visits per month. The SEEK experience is seamless across desktop, mobile and iPad and currently over 59 per cent of all visits to seek.com.au are via mobile devices. 

In Australia, SEEK also has the SEEK Learning business which connects people with education and training to advance their career, SEEK Commercial, where people can find businesses and franchises for sale and SEEK Volunteer, Australia’s largest single source of Volunteering opportunities.

Source: SEEK Omniture Data February 2015

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Media Release

12th March 2015

New SEEK Executive Team and structure changes

SEEK is today announcing a realignment of portfolios within its Executive Team to continue to position the business to take advantage of its growth opportunities.

The changes include expanded roles for existing members of the Executive Team, as well as three new internal Executive Team appointments to help SEEK achieve its aggressive growth ambitions.

The expanded SEEK Executive Team will be:

  • Andrew Bassat as CEO.
  • Michael Ilczynski is taking the role of MD SEEK Employment. He will lead SEEK Employment in Australia and New Zealand, including responsibility for Sales, Marketing, IT, Product, Strategy, Development and Delivery.
  • Peter Everingham is taking the role of MD SEEK International. He will continue to lead the growth of SEEK Asia and now also take on oversight of all of SEEK’s employment businesses outside of Australia and New Zealand.
  • Joe Powell is taking the role of MD SEEK Education and will have responsibility for the growing education portfolio including SEEK Learning, IDP, Swinburne Online and international expansion opportunities.
  • Meahan Callaghan will take on an expanded role as Group HR Director.
  • Group CFO our search is underway for a replacement Group CFO.
  • Isar Mazer will join the Executive Team as MD International Operations.  Isar will continue to drive operational cooperation with the international business as well as the Latin American businesses. He will also pick up leadership of early stage investments in other markets.
  • Ronnie Fink will join the Executive Team as Corporate Development Director and be responsible for driving SEEK’s acquisition activity.
  • Simon Lusted will join the Executive Team in the role of Group Strategy Director, where he will drive the employment strategy across all markets.

In addition to the executive appointments, Jason Lenga has been appointed as Special Advisor to the CEO and Board which he will commence when he finishes his current role as MD SEEK International. He will also remain on the Zhaopin Board.

Current CFO, John Armstrong, will remain with SEEK until the end of 2015 at which time we will transition to a new Group CFO. John will also continue on the Zhaopin Board.

SEEK CEO, Andrew Bassat, said the new Executive Team reflected the continued expansion and increased complexity of the business and also involved recognition of strong performance by everyone who had been given new or expanded roles.

“I am delighted to welcome on to the Executive Team Isar, Ronnie and Simon.  All three have been strong performers at SEEK over a long period of time so it is great to be able to reward their efforts and promote them to their new roles. I have no doubt their passion for driving great outcomes will see them perform strongly in their new roles.”

“For the existing Executive Team members, Mike Ilczynski, Joe Powell, Peter Everingham and Meahan Callaghan, I am delighted to announce that they have all been given the opportunity to take on more challenging roles.  These bigger roles reflect the leadership and strong performance that Mike, Joe, Peter and Meahan have demonstrated over many years at SEEK and I am looking forward to continuing to work closely with them. The new SEEK Executive Team has a strong mix of talented people with the right expertise to lead the business as it embarks on the next phase of its aggressive growth strategy.”

“I am also very pleased that the talents and experience of Jason and John will not be lost to us through Jason’s appointment as a Special Advisor, and through both Jason and John continuing their roles on the Zhaopin Board.”

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Media Release

11th March 2015

BANKING AND FINANCE INDUSTRY PROVING A GOOD INVESTMENT FOR JOBSEEKERS

The Banking and Financial Services industry is proving a good investment for jobseekers as employment opportunities across this industry show strong year-on-year growth, according to SEEK’s latest Employment Market Report.

The industry reported new job ad growth of 17 per cent year-on-year to February 2015 (as shown in Figure 1 below). Growth was driven out of the eastern seaboard states, with Banking and Finance jobs increasing year-on-year to February 2015 by 30 per cent in New South Wales, 28 per cent in Queensland, and 13 per cent in Victoria.

Figure 1: New job growth by industry nationally, February 2015 vs February 2014 Job growth by industry

Looking at the sectors within the industry, new job advertisements under Analysis & Reporting experienced a 55.3 per cent jump year-on-year. Other heroes in the Banking and Financial Services industry were jobs for Banking (corporate and institutional), experiencing growth of 44 per cent; Compliance and Risk, up 42.6 per cent; and Funds Management up 40.7 per cent.

The most difficult roles to fill currently in the industry are six-figure salary positions in Management, Business Banking and Compliance and Risk.

Positions across Stockbroking and Trading, Funds Management and Settlements are currently the easiest roles to fill, identified by the volume of applications received.

SEEK Managing Director of Employment and Learning, Joe Powell, said the pattern of advertising trends across industries closely mirrors the transitioning Australian economy where service oriented roles are in growth.

“It’s therefore not surprising roles in service industries such as Banking and Finance, Design and Architecture and Customer Service are in strong demand, while jobs specifically related to Mining, Resources and Energy continue to decline,” Mr Powell said.

Farming, Animal and Conservation topped the year on year growth at 38 per cent however the industry remains a low driver of labour demand when compared across all other industries.

Figure 2: Top four growing sectors in Banking and Financial Services nationally, year-on-year to February 2015. Growth sectors in Banking and Financial Services

FEBRUARY NEW JOB ADS DATA

Nationally new jobs advertised in February fell 3 per cent month-on-month, partly reversing January’s 5.6 per cent rise. Despite the dip in February’s figures, the Australian labour market continues to progress. The market is in better shape now than this time last year with new job ads 7.3 per cent higher than 12 months ago to February 2015.

“The factors across the economy we’re seeing such as low interest rates and lower petrol prices are helping to maintain a degree of optimism in the employment market. Furthermore the recent historic high number of dwelling construction approvals is having a positive flow on effect to labour demand for supporting services. The rate at which these factors continue to support the labour market is unknown and something we continue to watch,” Mr Powell said.

Labour market readings over the December to February period should be interpreted with some caution due to the volatility in readings from the large fluctuations in advertising volume and number of public holidays over the three month period.

State trends

As in recent months, most of the growth is being driven by Australia’s largest employing states, New South Wales and Victoria. While New South Wales recorded a 3.2 per cent dip and Victoria a minor 1 per cent dip in February, this followed strong January month-on-month gains of 9.8 and 5.1 per cent respectively.

Queensland new job ads dropped 3.8 per cent in February, the first monthly reading after the recent state election.

“It will be important to monitor whether the decline in Queensland is a sign of things to come or if it proves to be only a short-term reaction to a relatively unexpected election result in Queensland,” Mr Powell said.

South Australia and Western Australia each experienced relatively large falls, with 3.5 and 4.6 per cent month-on-month declines respectively. In each case, it was the third relatively sizeable fall in job ads in these markets over the past four months, which suggests tougher labour market conditions in these states for jobseekers.

Tasmania recorded the strongest growth in new job advertising of any state year-on-year, up 20 per cent to February 2015. This has been supported by two months of consecutive growth in January and February of 2015.

Advertising in the Territories has proven volatile in recent months, each recording a significant drop on last month’s large rises. Advertising in the Northern Territory has been weaker of late, albeit still at relatively elevated levels; while advertising in the Australian Capital Territory has generally improved somewhat over the past six to nine months.

Figure 3: New job ad growth by State and Territory year-on-year to February SEEK New Job Ad Growth

-- ENDS --

SEEK Employment Index (SEI)

The SEEK Employment Index fell 1.9 per cent across Australia in February 2015 indicating a strong volume of applications for every job ad which is currently posted on SEEK. The index fell across the states of: New South Wales down 2.9 per cent, Queensland down 2.5 per cent, South Australia down 4.8 per cent, Western Australia down 4.5 percent, but rose 1.7 per cent in Victoria.

About the SEEK Employment Report

The SEEK Employment Report provides a comprehensive overview of the Australian Employment Marketplace.

The report includes the SEEK Employment Index which was developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

It also includes the SEEK New Job Ad Index which measures only new job ads posted within the reported month to provide a clean measure of demand for labour across all classifications.

SEEK’s total job ad volume (not disclosed in this report) includes duplicated job advertisements and refreshed job ads. As a result, the SEEK New Job Ad Index does not always match the movement in SEEK’s total job ad volume.

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalization close to A$6 billion.

With exposure to 2.5 billion people and over 20 per cent of global GDP, SEEK makes a positive contribution to people's lives on a global scale.

SEEK Australia currently receives over 30 million visits per month. The SEEK experience is seamless across desktop, mobile and iPad and currently over 59 per cent of all visits to seek.com.au are via mobile devices.

In Australia, SEEK also has the SEEK Learning business which connects people with education and training to advance their career and SEEK Commercial, where people can find businesses and franchises for sale.

Source: SEEK Omniture Data February 2015

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Media Release

12th February 2015

Australia's largest industries pulling their weight - New job ads up

SEEK's latest employment marketplace data suggests Aussies looking for work in the IT industry could have the best luck landing a job, with the sector continuing to lead new job advertisements during January 2015.

The Information, Communications and Technology industry was responsible for 10.7 per cent of total SEEK new job advertisements in 2014, representing the largest employment advertising classification.

The sector continues to strengthen in 2015, with new job ads up 14 per cent year on year to January 2015 figures.

Managing Director of IT recruitment firm M&T Resources, Chris Sandham said digital transformation and the rise of analytics and intelligence are all areas that have so far driven the biggest demands they've ever seen for IT talent.

"We foresee continued overall growth, as most of our clients are at the beginning stages of their transformation and integration programs. Organisations are positioning themselves for cloud-based moves, while some are attempting to further develop their product offerings which will rely on technology initiatives in analytics and information management, CRM, and digital," he said.

The other major industries across Australia, including Trades and Services (accounting for 7.7 per cent of SEEK's new job ads last year), experienced a 12 per cent year on year growth to January 2015; and Healthcare and Medical (7.4 per cent of new job ads last year) also surged ahead with 13 per cent year on year growth.

SEEK Roles driving demand

January Data - Overview

New jobs advertised in January surged 4.1 per cent nationally from December 2014. This was 10.9 per cent higher than January 2014.

SEEK Managing Director of Employment and Learning, Joe Powell said, "Through 2014 we saw promising signs in the labour market and it's good to see that the labour market is looking in better shape than 12 months ago.

"Job advertising data is often a little more volatile around the December/January holiday period, so we must be cautious interpreting trends due to the heavy seasonal swings in advertising. Still, the year on year increase is very encouraging."

State trends

Looking month on month to January 2015, sizeable gains were recorded in the states with the larger share of the national market. New South Wales and Victoria each increased new job ads by 5.2 per cent month on month, which largely drove the national surge. A smaller increase of 1 per cent was recorded in Queensland, although this was the state's third increase in the past four months.

New South Wales remains the labour market showing the most encouraging trend in the country with new job advertising more than 18 per cent higher than a year ago. In Victoria, new job advertising is more than 11 per cent higher and up 3.6 per cent in South Australia.

The Queensland labour market continues to record only moderate growth, up 5.4 per cent year on year. This likely reflects its diverse economic characteristics, with a weaker mining industry offsetting some improving signs in the non-mining economy.

Weakness persists in Western Australia, down 1.5 per cent year on year to January 2015 – now the only state with advertising at levels below that seen a year ago.

"The January data shows encouraging signs for the national labour market, with quite varying performances among the states, likely reflecting each state's particular economic circumstances," Mr Powell said.

"Hopefully, lower petrol prices, the lower Australian dollar, and lower interest rates, will support further improvements in the labour market in the months ahead and offset any uncertainty as a result of the current political situation."

SEEK New Job Ad Growth

SEEK Employment Index (SEI)

The SEEK Employment Index increased 3.1 per cent in January 2015 indicating a strong volume of applications for every job ad which is currently posted on SEEK.

The Index increased in New South Wales 3.9 per cent, Victoria 2.4 per cent, Queensland 2.2 per cent, South Australia 5.1 per cent and Western Australia 1.7 per cent.

About SEEK

SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalization close to A$6 billion.

With exposure to 2.5 billion people and over 20 per cent of global GDP, SEEK makes a positive contribution to people's lives on a global scale.

SEEK Australia currently receives over 26.6 million visits per month. The SEEK experience is seamless across desktop, mobile and iPad and currently over 54 per cent of all visits to seek.com.au are via mobile devices.

In Australia, SEEK also has the SEEK Learning business which connects people with education and training to advance their career and SEEK Commercial, where people can find businesses and franchises for sale.

Source: SEEK Omniture Data September 2014

About SEEK Intelligence

Details can be found online at http://www.seek.com.au/investor/employment-index

About the SEEK Employment Index

Developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand.

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Media Release

15th January 2015

Aussie Labour Market spurred on by "non-resource" industries

SEEK's latest data reveals the credit for 2014's positive growth in job advertising lies with our nation's "non-resource" industries.

As illustrated in SEEK's data table below, which represents the change in total job ad volume between 2013 and 2014, Mining, Resources and Energy finished weak, having recorded a 36 per cent decrease on 2013 as the boom of previous years continues to slow.

Yet despite this downturn, 2014 was a year of growth for SEEK's new job ads, which were up 9.7 per cent over the previous year, consistent with ANZ's reporting of an 11.4 per cent increase in job ads across the broader employment industry over the same time period.

The top five industries for percentage job ad growth between 2013 and 2014 include:

  • Design and Architecture (+42 per cent),
  • Education and Training (+16 per cent),
  • Farming, Animals and Conservation (+16 per cent),
  • Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics (+13 per cent), and,
  • Community Services and Development (+13 per cent).

Table 1: Change in total new job ad volume between 2013 and 2014 by classification
SEEK New Job Ad Index

Looking specifically at the month of December, after several consecutive months of positive new job ad volume to November 2014, new job ads slipped 0.9 per cent.

Month-on-month, new job ads fell in New South Wales (-0.3 per cent), Victoria (-1.1 per cent), South Australia (-2.4 per cent) and Western Australia (-2.6 per cent) but rose by 0.8 per cent in Queensland.

SEEK New Job Ad Index

"Job advertising data is often a little more volatile around the December/January period due to the large changes in advertising volumes experienced over the Australian holiday period. These fluctuations can cause challenges in seasonally adjusting the data and, as such, we don't place too much reliance on December data but wait to see how the beginning of 2015 unfolds," says Powell.

"The softer finish to the year reflects diverging state and territory trends which at the present time are combining to produce moderate growth in Australian employment. NSW remains the strongest labour market in terms of job advertising rising 16.3 per cent year on year, the strongest increase of any labour market over 2014.

Mr Powell goes on to say, "It will be interesting to see what impact on the labour market the combination of lower oil prices, low interest rates and the low Australian dollar have. For now the trend suggests the Australian employment market continues its trajectory of moderate growth".

Job Industry Trends

Looking at other job industry trends, Table 2 below highlights the year on year change between December 2013 job ad volumes to that seen in December 2014. Recoveries in Construction (+17 per cent year-on-year) and Engineering (+23.6 per cent year-on-year) suggest this growth in housing and infrastructure is more than offsetting the drag from weaker mining investment in these classifications.

This also created a flow on effect to related industries, such as:

  • Design and Architecture (+53 per cent)
  • Banking and Financial Services (+25.5 per cent)
  • Trades and Services (+22.6 per cent).

"Surprisingly, despite the construction surge, Real Estate and Property roles, such as Property Managers, and Real Estate Sales Agents, recorded a near 10 per cent year-on-year decline," says Powell.

Amongst the larger categories of job advertising across Australia, there were solid gains recorded in Information Communication Technology (+17.9 per cent year-on-year), Healthcare (+24 per cent year-on-year) and Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics (+18 per cent year-on-year).

While the strength of these non-mining sectors is positive, other large employing industries: Retail (+3 per cent), Sales (+5.6 per cent), and Accounting (+6.4 per cent) are showing only moderate signs of growth year-on-year.

Encouragingly there have been 16 per cent year-on-year gains in Government and Defence with State and Local Government roles driving the demand, and Community Services.

Table 2: New Job Ads December 2013 vs December 2014
SEEK New Job Ads for December Year on Year

State Trends

Queensland presents encouraging news; December was the third successive monthly increase in job advertising in Queensland, which has previously been underperforming. This may reflect a tentative turning point in Queensland labour demand and bears watching in coming months particularly with the upcoming state election. Queensland job ads rose 0.8 per cent month-on-month in December.

In contrast to the promising performance of New South Wales and Queensland, weaker trends have been evident in Western Australia and South Australia. The large 7.5 per cent fall in Western Australia recorded in November was confirmed with a further 2.6 per cent month-on-month fall recorded in December. This likely reflects the influence of further declines in iron ore prices and sharply lower oil prices in recent months.

The second largest employment market in Australia Victoria remained relatively flat in the month of December, dipping 1.1 per cent, effectively reversing the 1 per cent rise recorded in November. Victoria finished the year with new job ads up 9.5 per cent year on year.

SEEK Employment Index (SEI)

The SEEK Employment Index, which shows the number of job ads relative to applications for those ads, declined in December 2014 by 1.4 per cent.

  • The SEI fell in all major regions: New South Wales (-1.1 per cent), Victoria (-0.5 per cent), Queensland (-0.6 per cent), South Australia (-1.8 per cent) and Western Australia (-3.4 per cent).

About SEEK
SEEK is a diverse group of companies, comprised of a strong portfolio of online employment, educational, commercial and volunteer businesses. SEEK is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange, where it is a top 50 company with a market capitalization close to A$6 billion.

With exposure to 2.5 billion people and over 20 per cent of global GDP, SEEK makes a positive contribution to people’s lives on a global scale.

SEEK Australia currently receives over 26.6 million visits per month. The SEEK experience is seamless across desktop, mobile and iPad and currently over 54 per cent of all visits to seek.com.au are via mobile devices. 

In Australia, SEEK also has the SEEK Learning business which connects people with education and training to advance their career and SEEK Commercial, where people can find businesses and franchises for sale.

Source: SEEK Omniture Data October 2014

About SEEK Intelligence
Details can be found online at SEEK Employment Index

About the SEEK Employment Index
Developed in consultation with Victoria University's Centre of Strategic Economic Studies, the SEEK Employment Index (SEI) is the first Australian aggregate indicator to measure the interaction between labour market supply and labour market demand. 

back to index