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Youth Justice Worker (Custodial) - Malmsbury

Advertiser: Department of Justice and Community Safety3.4 out of 53.4 overall rating (34 employee reviews) More jobs from this company

Job Information

Job Listing Date
27 Nov 2019
Location
Bendigo, Goldfields & Macedon Ranges
Salary
$52,493 - $67,410
Work Type
Full Time
Classification
Self Employment, Self Employment

Youth Justice Worker (Custodial) - Malmsbury

Set boundaries. Build futures.

Apply now to be considered for March 2020 intake

  • Apply your maturity and life experience to provide a secure and constructive environment for vulnerable young people with challenging behavioural issues
  • Multiple full-time ongoing vacancies available on a 76-hour fortnight rotating roster.
  • A starting salary of $52,493 up to $67,410 after penalty rates, overtime and superannuation.
  • No formal qualifications are required but professional experience in any field is highly valued.
  • We're looking for empathetic, honourable and resilient people who can provide a secure and constructive environment for vulnerable young people with challenging behavioural issues.

We are now looking for expressions of interest in Youth Justice Worker roles at Victoria's two youth justice custodial centres:

Please note, you can only work at one custodial precinct. Due to 12-hour shifts and for health and safety reasons, you must live within 100 kilometres of the precinct location. You will be given the opportunity to make your preference in your application.

What's it like working at a youth custodial precinct?

“This place has probably been the best school of life I have ever come across. You've got different staff and so many young people, all with their own background, their own personalities. You learn so much, not only about them, but also about yourself.” – Ruby, Youth Justice Worker

What makes a great youth justice worker?

“You need a certain level of maturity … that doesn't mean to say you have to be over 40. But life experience counts for a lot, and just having patience and resilience.” – John, Youth Justice Worker

Great youth justice workers come from all sorts of backgrounds. It’s never too late for a career change, and you might be surprised how your professional experience could help you as an youth justice workers. If you have ever been self-employed, you likely needed initiative, energy and organisation – these are also vital attributes for a youth justice workers.

However, there are some personal attributes that are essential in a youth justice worker. A good youth justice worker will have these qualities and attributes:

  • life experience and maturity: when managing challenging behaviour, your maturity, integrity and life experience will help you make good decisions quickly and consistently
  • effective communication skills: do you naturally and quickly connect with others in conversation? Building rapport with young people is crucial. Delivering information professionally and confidently will help build mutual trust and respect.
  • resilience: the job is both physically and emotionally taxing so a measured and calm response to stressful situations and setbacks will help you persevere and achieve your goals.
  • conflict management skills: how do you cope in stressful situations? Your ability to confidently assess and then react quickly to conflict situations will be tested on a daily basis.
  • empathy and cultural awareness: an appreciation and understanding of a range of different cultures and backgrounds will help you meet the complex needs of our young people.
  • teamwork: a safe and secure youth justice facility is built on teamwork. You will need to work collaboratively and cooperatively to achieve your goals as a close-knit crew. 

"A good YJ worker is someone who can develop a rapport with the young people. And that's especially important when you're trying to de-escalate a situation." – Di, Supervisor, Parkville

Information sessions

After watching the video above and browsing YouthJusticeJobs.vic.gov.au, you may still want more info about the youth justice worker role. We encourage you to come along to one of our information sessions. You'll hear about the experiences of current youth justice workers directly, and also be able to ask any questions you have about the job or recruitment process.

Saturday 7th December
Bendigo
La Trobe Art Institute
10am – 11:30am

Please register here

Wednesday 11th December
Melton
Melton Community Hall
6:15pm – 7:45pm

Please register here

Saturday 14th December
Docklands
Library At The Dock
10:45am – 12pm 

Please register here

We strongly encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply

We ensure cultural sensitivities are catered for throughout the recruitment process, and you will also receive ongoing support from our Aboriginal Employment Team. If successful in securing a role, you will have access to additional networking opportunities and peer support through the department's Aboriginal Employee Network (AEN). Click here for more about how the department supports Aboriginal employees.

What is the application process?

The application process has a number of steps.

  • Apply online and complete a video interview 
    If your application progresses to the next stage you will complete a short video interview on your computer or smartphone.
  • Attend a practical simulation
    So we can better understand your conflict resolution style – and you can better appreciate the day-to-day realities of the role – you will complete a 10-minute role play scenario that aims to simulate a possible incident in a youth justice facility.
  • Visit an assessment centre
    The recruitment team will facilitate a number of individual and group activities to ensure you have the appropriate skills, conduct and characteristics to become a great youth justice worker.
  • Attend health assessment and undergo security checks
    A health assessment will determine if you can do the job safely and without putting yourself or others at risk – see the attached health assessment information document. As the position requires high security clearance and moral character, we will also conduct extensive reference and security checks. If you would like to know more information about the health and fitness assessments, please watch the video found here.
  • Accept your offer
    At this point, you'll receive our congratulations and an offer of a new job as a youth justice worker.
  • Time to start training
    There's a lot to learn once you become a youth justice worker, so all new recruits undergo six weeks of fully paid pre-service training, combining both theoretical and practical learning.

Are you up to helping young people build a better future for themselves and our state? Apply now!

Applications will be regularly reviewed up until the closing date, so please do not hesitate in applying.

For more information, please contact the Youth Justice Recruitment Team on yjcsrecruitment@justice.vic.gov.au

Set boundaries. Build futures.

Apply now to be considered for March 2020 intake

  • Apply your maturity and life experience to provide a secure and constructive environment for vulnerable young people with challenging behavioural issues
  • Multiple full-time ongoing vacancies available on a 76-hour fortnight rotating roster.
  • A starting salary of $52,493 up to $67,410 after penalty rates, overtime and superannuation.
  • No formal qualifications are required but professional experience in any field is highly valued.
  • We're looking for empathetic, honourable and resilient people who can provide a secure and constructive environment for vulnerable young people with challenging behavioural issues.

We are now looking for expressions of interest in Youth Justice Worker roles at Victoria's two youth justice custodial centres:

Please note, you can only work at one custodial precinct. Due to 12-hour shifts and for health and safety reasons, you must live within 100 kilometres of the precinct location. You will be given the opportunity to make your preference in your application.

What's it like working at a youth custodial precinct?

“This place has probably been the best school of life I have ever come across. You've got different staff and so many young people, all with their own background, their own personalities. You learn so much, not only about them, but also about yourself.” – Ruby, Youth Justice Worker

What makes a great youth justice worker?

“You need a certain level of maturity … that doesn't mean to say you have to be over 40. But life experience counts for a lot, and just having patience and resilience.” – John, Youth Justice Worker

Great youth justice workers come from all sorts of backgrounds. It’s never too late for a career change, and you might be surprised how your professional experience could help you as an youth justice workers. If you have ever been self-employed, you likely needed initiative, energy and organisation – these are also vital attributes for a youth justice workers.

However, there are some personal attributes that are essential in a youth justice worker. A good youth justice worker will have these qualities and attributes:

  • life experience and maturity: when managing challenging behaviour, your maturity, integrity and life experience will help you make good decisions quickly and consistently
  • effective communication skills: do you naturally and quickly connect with others in conversation? Building rapport with young people is crucial. Delivering information professionally and confidently will help build mutual trust and respect.
  • resilience: the job is both physically and emotionally taxing so a measured and calm response to stressful situations and setbacks will help you persevere and achieve your goals.
  • conflict management skills: how do you cope in stressful situations? Your ability to confidently assess and then react quickly to conflict situations will be tested on a daily basis.
  • empathy and cultural awareness: an appreciation and understanding of a range of different cultures and backgrounds will help you meet the complex needs of our young people.
  • teamwork: a safe and secure youth justice facility is built on teamwork. You will need to work collaboratively and cooperatively to achieve your goals as a close-knit crew. 

"A good YJ worker is someone who can develop a rapport with the young people. And that's especially important when you're trying to de-escalate a situation." – Di, Supervisor, Parkville

Information sessions

After watching the video above and browsing YouthJusticeJobs.vic.gov.au, you may still want more info about the youth justice worker role. We encourage you to come along to one of our information sessions. You'll hear about the experiences of current youth justice workers directly, and also be able to ask any questions you have about the job or recruitment process.

Saturday 7th December
Bendigo
La Trobe Art Institute
10am – 11:30am

Please register here

Wednesday 11th December
Melton
Melton Community Hall
6:15pm – 7:45pm

Please register here

Saturday 14th December
Docklands
Library At The Dock
10:45am – 12pm 

Please register here

We strongly encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply

We ensure cultural sensitivities are catered for throughout the recruitment process, and you will also receive ongoing support from our Aboriginal Employment Team. If successful in securing a role, you will have access to additional networking opportunities and peer support through the department's Aboriginal Employee Network (AEN). Click here for more about how the department supports Aboriginal employees.

What is the application process?

The application process has a number of steps.

  • Apply online and complete a video interview 
    If your application progresses to the next stage you will complete a short video interview on your computer or smartphone.
  • Attend a practical simulation
    So we can better understand your conflict resolution style – and you can better appreciate the day-to-day realities of the role – you will complete a 10-minute role play scenario that aims to simulate a possible incident in a youth justice facility.
  • Visit an assessment centre
    The recruitment team will facilitate a number of individual and group activities to ensure you have the appropriate skills, conduct and characteristics to become a great youth justice worker.
  • Attend health assessment and undergo security checks
    A health assessment will determine if you can do the job safely and without putting yourself or others at risk – see the attached health assessment information document. As the position requires high security clearance and moral character, we will also conduct extensive reference and security checks. If you would like to know more information about the health and fitness assessments, please watch the video found here.
  • Accept your offer
    At this point, you'll receive our congratulations and an offer of a new job as a youth justice worker.
  • Time to start training
    There's a lot to learn once you become a youth justice worker, so all new recruits undergo six weeks of fully paid pre-service training, combining both theoretical and practical learning.

Are you up to helping young people build a better future for themselves and our state? Apply now!

Applications will be regularly reviewed up until the closing date, so please do not hesitate in applying.

For more information, please contact the Youth Justice Recruitment Team on yjcsrecruitment@justice.vic.gov.au

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